Tornado Season is Coming

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Tornado Season is Coming

Dana Labart, Reporter

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As the summer fast approaches, so does the threat of extreme, dangerous weather. In Kansas City, we sit at the very heart of “Tornado Alley” which is a term used to describe the area of the U.S. that most frequently see tornados.

Scientists and meteorologists are determining that this year, Kansas City has reached an all-time high, surpassing the largest spike in tornadoes they’d seen since 2003.

“Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri — those areas are still going to get tornadoes. I mean there’s no doubt about that,” said David Easterling, the director of national climate assessment for the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. “I think where you end up getting these kinds of storms is probably going to end up expanding.”

On May 22nd of this year alone, there were 5 tornadoes reported to touch down in Kansas and Missouri, leaving a path of death and destruction in its wake.

“It’s a scary situation, watching the news and all of a sudden hearing the sirens,” said sophomore Julius Briscoe, commenting on the storm that ripped its way through the Metro on May 28th. A total of 8 Missouri cities and counties were issued a severe tornado warning that night.

“You’re always scared of what mother nature might do and you’re just powerless to stop it,” said Briscoe.

The CDC (Center for Disease Control) has released a few tips on keeping yourself safe from natural disasters such as tornadoes, which we recommend everyone takes a look at.

“The weather in Kansas City right now is crazy. There is so much rain and flooding, and not to mention tornadoes,” said freshman Aidan Hance.

“I love rain and thunderstorms, but not to the point it has gotten in the past few weeks [bad floods and winds],” said Hance.

With tornado season only just beginning, lasting from May to early to mid-July, it is expected that Missouri will see quite a few more close calls before the end of the season. Scientists urge residents to stay updated on the local forecast and be prepared for any situation, having an action plan in place in the event of unexpected or life threatening weather conditions.

 

About the Photo: Building Block Daycare in Lawrence, Kansas only moments after an EF4 tornado tore into it on May 28th. No injuries have been reported.

Photo Credit: Dave D’Marko, Fox 4 News